RESEARCH

The following charitable organizations share our passion and want to make their resources available to you.

Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center Developmental Therapeutics

We will use the funds from the St. Louis Men’s Group Against Cancer to perform the genomic and immunologic analyses on patient tumor tissue in 2 new clinical trials for brain tumors and breast cancer patients that we are developing at Siteman.  We found that brain tumors that have mutations in circadian rhythm clock genes are significantly more susceptible to chemotherapy given at certain times of day. This grant will fund the genomic analyses of brain tumors for mutations in clock genes as part of our new clinical trial to administer chemotherapy at different times of day. This grant will fund the immune cell and genomic analyses of patient breast cancer tumor tissue taken before and after chemotherapy with macrophage targeted therapy in our new clinical trial. Together these studies will let us know how best to personalize therapies to a patient’s tumor.

www.siteman.wustl.edu

Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals of Greater St. Louis

Funds received from the St. Louis Men’s Group Against Cancer will be allocated to the Cancer Fund at St. Louis Children’s Hospital and the Bob Costas Cancer Center and the St. Louis Cord Blood Bank and Stem Cell Transplant program at SSM Cardinal Glennon Children’s Medical Center to enhance patient care, education, research and equipment.

www.cmn-stl.org

The Saint Louis University Cancer Center’s Hereditary Cancer Program

Funding from the St. Louis Men’s Group Against Cancer will provide free genetic testing for at least 50 individuals.

www.slu.edu/cancer-center-home

Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center Breast Cancer Program

The money will provide critical support of clinical trial biopsies of breast cancers at Siteman Cancer Center Breast Cancer Program. These biopsies are necessary for the development of new tests to customize treatment and research of new drugs to improve the chance of cure.

www.barnesjewish.org/cancer-center

Division of Urologic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine

Near infrared imaging has been shown to be effective in minimizing positive surgical margins during open surgery for breast cancer. We want to apply Near Infrared Fluorescence Imaging to endoscopic resections of bladder tumors and laparoscopic resection of kidney tumors. We will use the funds to purchase a Near Infrared endoscope and to study the feasibility of this approach in a pig model.

www.urology.wustl.edu

Washington University-Neurofibromatosis Related Cancer

Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are a deadly type of soft tissue sarcoma with no effective treatment options. The purpose of our project is to develop a collection of genetically characterized patient-derived MPNSTs to enable the evaluation of new treatment strategies.

www.nfcenter.wustl.edu

Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center-Prostate Ca Risk Stratification

This grant will enable us to develop and maintain a rich data resource that has led to a number of exciting prostate cancer research collaborations that are leading to identification of prostate cancer preventive measures as well as risk factors for disease aggressiveness. Your support has allowed us to be able to collect and store serum and prostate cancer tissue samples on over 1,900 prostate cancer patients and has led to local, national and international collaborations to identify high-risk prostate cancer as well as potential preventive factors.

www.siteman.wustl.edu

Heartland Cancer Research

Funds will provide patients in over 30 counties in southeastern and central Missouri access to the highest quality cancer research studies. Through our research program, medically under-served patients obtain the latest treatments and cancer surveillance without having to travel to distant cancer centers.

www.heartlandccop.com

Washington University – Gene Therapy Prostate Cancer

We will use the STLMGAC funds to create and test our genetically designed cold virus vectors for their ability to inhibit metastatic growth in novel models we have also created.

www.medicine.wustl.edu/research